November 30, 2012
Vilnius, Lithuania

Conference

This conference is for and by people who actually build stuff.
The talks are about building actual stuff, not theory.
The rot of the trenches never smelled so good.

Speakers

Johannes Brodwall

Johannes Brodwall discovered Extreme Programming more than ten years ago and has been trying to put Agile practices into his programming work since. He works as Chief Scientist for Exilesoft, an Agile offshoring provider, where he pair programs and pair architects locally and remotely with developers and architects in Norway, Sweden and Sri Lanka.

Udi Dahan

Recognized by Microsoft with the Most Valuable Professional award for 5 years in the areas of Connected Systems and Architecture, Udi serves on the advisory board of several of Microsoft next-generation technologies. In addition to contributing to 4 books and 7 years of blogging, Udi is one of 44 experts in Europe recognized by the International .NET Association and a top-rated speaker at software development conferences all over the world.

Sebastien Lambla

Sebastien Lambla runs Caffeine IT, a London consultancy helping the good people of the world adopt new technologies, new processes, new methodologies and in general anything that's new and shiny. Specializing in cutting-edge tools, from REST architectures to occasionally connected rich clients, Sebastien has been developing with .net since 2000, and has a secret love affair with javascript. In his spare time he's working on OpenRasta, a resource-oriented MVC framework, and OpenWrap, an alternative package manager.

Greg Young

Greg Young is a loud mouth about many things including CQRS, Event Sourcing, and getting your tests to do something more than validating your code. He is currently involved with Event Store a functional database geteventstore.com.

Jonathan Worthington

From business applications to compiler writing, and from .Net to Perl, Jonathan has a wide range of software development experience. He deeply believes that good development has to be a strongly holistic activity, drawing on mathematics, engineering, linguistics, economics and more. By looking at insights from many fields, he works hard to deliver solid and maintainable software solutions. Originally from the UK, and having spent time in Spain and Slovakia, Jonathan is currently based in Sweden and working as an architecture consultant and teacher for Edument AB.

Rob Ashton

Rob can eat three pizzas in 15 minutes, down a pint of Guinness in less than 4 seconds and has been known to occasionally write code in between these dangerous eating and drinking binge sessions. Originally hailing from a small island in Europe (Isle of Man), living on a slightly larger island for a few years (England), he now lives in Belgium which really isn't that much different except the beer is stronger and the trains are cheaper and mostly run on time.
He gets paid to help developers do better things, doesn't really care about one framework or another and prefers to spend his time outside of this building awful games for the browser.

Mantas Klasavičius

Infrastructure architect at Adform company. Has over 9 years of experience with background in Windows, Linux and networks administration. Currently he is specializing in high-performance computing, continuous deployment and Cloud services. His new passion is helping developers to reveal the beauty of monitoring. Mantas is certified Cisco (CCNA) and Microsoft (MCSA, MCSE) specialist.

Robert Pickering

Robert is a fun loving programmer who claims that he is Falling Outside The Normal Moral Constraints. He enjoys travelling round Europe in a big shirt trying to teach people that real programmers use the stack. Robert is a big fan of functional programming, F# and enjoys reading popular science and science fiction whether it’s popular or not. He lives in a quaint French village near Paris with his wife and their four cats.

Adam Steele

Constant builder of things, Adam's secret to success is outworking and outcaring everyone.

Program

Day 1
30th November, 2012
08.30 - 09.00

Registration

Arrival and registration.

09.00 - 9.40
Keynote

A surprise but they don't build software!

Event opening, introduction, keynote.

Room 1
9.40 - 10.05

Coffee Break

Coffee Break. Lunch served in open areas from 11.00 to 13.30.

10.05 - 11.00
Session

Science and Software Development

Robert Pickering

Ever feel you work in an industry that is run by gurus and buzz words rather than by scientist, engineers, studies and facts? Are you fed up with being told your ‘doing it wrong’ because you’re not following the latest three letter acronym methodology? Ever get have your brain mangled, trying to follow all the best practices, even the best practices that contradict the other best practices? In this talk, I will argue that, while aspects of programing might be an art form, that science and engineering should be a software developer’s main tools. I will show how the scientific process, the process of investigating and verify claims, is the only to rid our industry of all this quackery that is holding us back. This talk is a call to arms to all those that want to change the software industry for the better, to produce faster, less bug software with less fuss.

Room 1
10.05 - 11.00
Session

Metric Driven Development (an Adform Case Study)

Mantas Klasavičius

The presentation describes one start-up project and the way we solved problems and moved things forward to handle 70 000 requests per second from the initial 5 000 - with the same hardware. For developers - applications are the essence, but there are a lot more additional pieces that could influence reliability, accessibility and performance of applications. It will be explained how and why we attracted development guys to the world of monitoring and metrics, the sphere which was considered solely operations playground, how we combined different metrics: business, application, hardware, 3rd parties and metrics from the cloud to reach our goals, which tools and practices proved to be effective and which not.

Room 2
All day
Workshop

Build Stuff With Us - Room Open All Day

You build stuff? Hey we build stuff too! We want you to come actually build stuff with us. Let's pair, work on interesting things. Got a tough problem? Let's put it on the whiteboard. This room is for no holds barred hacking. Bring your laptop and an open mind!

Room 3
11.10 - 12.05
Session

Extreme Programming Live

Johannes Brodwall

Good programming is not something that can be explained, it has to be experienced. In this talk, you will see pair programming and test-driven development in action. The talk will involve the audience and draw on your insight to show how programming can be more fun! If you want to understand how serious test-driven development looks, this talk is for you.

As a programmer with over a decade of experience in test-driven development and refactoring, Johannes Brodwall likes to pair program with others to exchange experience, tips and tricks. In preparation for this talk, Johannes has been pair programming with local developers. During the talk, he will replay one of these sessions with a local developer. He will then discuss the practices, tricks, design ideas and interaction that they showed, showing concrete ideas for how you can become a better developer.

Johannes is looking for local developers to pair program with for this talk. If you're a Java, C#, JavaScript or Ruby developer with a few years experience who would like to some really cool tricks and gain some local credibility as a developer, please contact him at @jhannes on Twitter.

Room 1
11.10 - 12.05
Session

Everyday Lessons from Open Source Compiler Development

Jonathan Worthington

For the last few years I've been part of the Perl 6 compiler development team. Building a compiler for a large language in an open source setting with a geographically distributed team mostly made up of volunteers presents a range of challenges. However, despite the challenges and limited resources, we have development practices that in many cases beat what I find in many commercial development teams. Additionally, the overall mode of operation of a compiler - separating analysis from transformation - is also more widely applicable.

In this session I'll present some of the key insights I've collected in the course of the project and found useful to apply in a wider context. They range from design patterns through to testing and our approach to collaborative bug investigation and management.

Room 2
12.05 - 12.45

Lunch Break

Lunch/Coffee Break. Lunch served in open areas from 11.00 to 13.30.

12.45 - 13.40
Session

Performance in HTML and Javascript.

Rob Ashton

Javascript is slow, HTML5 is slow, the web is slow - you need to be native if you're developing things for mobile devices - none of this is true, except the bits which are - and after writing applications that have fast as a feature, and writing games which have less than 25ms per frame to execute their logic there are a few things that I have picked up and want to share with everybody about reaching their desired performance goals. Let's take a look at some common pitfalls, and some less common pitfalls and try to explain why things are the way they are by looking at how the various JS engines are implemented.

Room 1
12.45 - 16.00
Workshop

Learn functional programming through music!

Robert Pickering

Workshop with Robert Pickering about learning functional programming through music.

Room 2
13.55 - 14.50
Session

HTTP Caching 101

Sebastien Lambla

Caching is one of the most powerful feature of HTTP and ReSTful architecture, and also one of the most misunderstood. This session will review what can be done with HTTP, debunk a few myths and show some commonly-implemented patterns you can implement in your own clients.

Room 1
11.00 - 11.10

Coffee Break

Coffee Break. Lunch served in open areas from 11.00 to 13.30.

15.15 - 16.10
Session

Technical Lessons Learned Building the Event Store

Greg Young

How do SSDs differ from spindle drives? How do you optimize for both? Need to use 30gb of RAM in a java/.NET process? The GC won't like this! These are just some of the many problems we faced building out the Event Store. This session is a deep dive into how we solved these problems both from architectural and coding perspectives.

Room 1
16.30 - 17.25
Session

What I learned from 6 years of building NServiceBus

Udi Dahan

It's been about 6 years since I brought NServiceBus out to the world and, even though I knew quite a lot about developing complex software at the time, there were some pretty major things I underestimated along the way around backwards compatibility and extensibility. For the entrepreneurs out there, I'll also talk a bit about community and business - things I was lucky enough to get right, and some things I'm still getting wrong.

Room 1
17.25 - 17.30

Closing

Closing Day 1 Sessions.

Room 1
17.30 - ?

Stick around for the party!

Get together downstairs for beers and chats.

Day 2
1st December, 2012
10.15 - 17.30
Workshop

Agile programming in practice with coding dojo

Johannes Brodwall

A Coding Dojo is a fun and social way to become a better programmer. Johannes is an experienced coding coach who will guide you through a few hours of programming that will transform your understand your craft and yourself as a programmer. In the workshop you get to try out pair programming, test-driven development and continuous refactoring for yourself and you get lots of recommendations on how to improve your coding and testing. You will need to bring your own computer with a development environment of your choice. Recommended for Java, Ruby, JavaScript and C# developers.

Room 2
10.15 - 17.30
Workshop

REST Workshop

Sebastien Lambla

ReST as an architecture can sound very complicated and daunting. In this one day session, we'll see how it really is the architecture of the web, explain what URIs, media types, generic interfaces, microdata and state actually mean, and show how introducing ReST concepts in your application will introduce better scalability and reduce coupling by building a sample application.

Room 3

Location

Crown Plaza
M.k. Ciurlionio Str. 84, Vilnius, Lithuania